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LYN A. FOX FINE PUEBLO POTTERY
posted at 10:17 am on 6/26/2017

In 1997, a young man by the name of Lyn Fox caught the bug.  It was a devastating occurrence, as it changed the course of his life forever.  The bug, of course, was an unstoppable urge to be a Gallery owner of Native American art.  Thus the start of his trek.

In 2017, Lyn and his lovely wife Ellen will celebrate the 20th anniversary of Lyn A. Fox Fine Pueblo Pottery.  Given the frequency with which galleries open and subsequently close, this milestone is a testament to Lyn’s knowledge and perseverance.  Lyn has said, and many other gallery owners echo, that “owning a gallery is a labor of love, as nobody makes any money doing it.  Following the vibrant Native American interest of the 1980’s, the past two decades have been tepid at best.”

Lyn started with historic pottery dough bowls, many from the Santo Domingo Pueblo.  These large bowls appeal to well-heeled collectors who know a lot about Native American art, and who can appreciate the artistry of potters from many decades past.  Lyn has written several small books about these bowls, and I am happy to have a signed copy of each book in my reference library.

In the past few years, however, Lyn has branched out in an additional direction.  He has been carrying new pottery by some of the hottest Native American potters, including Russell Sanchez, Dominique Toya, Nancy Youngblood, Chris Youngblood, and Jason Ebelacker, showcasing new forms and styles by these amazing artists.  Because of these relationships, Lyn has also been able to coordinate activities like a day of actually making pots with master potter Dominique Toya in the Jemez Pueblo, one of the most exciting activities I have ever done.

Lyn, who moved to Florida for family reasons for a while, has recently returned to Santa Fe on a full-time basis, and as a result has begun much more interactive activity with gallery shoppers.  His Black on Black exhibition in the summer of 2016, for example, includes both historic Santa Clara pottery as well as some of the most contemporary pottery, and also featured pottery making and carving demonstrations by current potters.

One of my favorite things to do on Canyon Road is to drop by Lyn’s gallery, admire the new items he as from his hot potters, and chat with Lyn about Native American pottery.  In addition to being a wealth of knowledge, Lyn is always willing to cheerfully share what he has learned with others. 

In 2016, Lyn was kind enough to write one of the two forewords for our new book, Tales of The Dancing Rabbit, and I think he appreciates the effort that we have taken to stay true to the stories and artistry of Native American artists and culture.  In that sense, Lyn is a good role model to follow, and I truly appreciate his advice and support.

So if you are in Santa Fe, and just happen to wander up about halfway to the top of Canyon Road, stop in and say hello to Lyn and look at his careful blending of historic Santo Domingo dough bowls and classic black Santa Clara pottery, along with several new contemporary items.  The contrast of styles is remarkable, but the high level of artistry in both styles is very evident.

 





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